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Friday, September 21 2012

Homebuilders haven’t been this confident about sales, the outlook of future sales, and buyer traffic since June 2006, which is right before the housing crisis took hold, a new index shows.

For September, the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index, which measures builders’ outlook on current sales, future sales, and buyer demand, reached its highest level in six years. Plus, homebuilders expect the housing recovery to strengthen within the next six months.

Homebuilders say they’ve experienced some of the best sales levels they've had in six years, and buyer traffic has returned to May 2006 levels, the index shows.

"We think things have turned around and this recovery is sustainable," Patrick Newport, an economist with IHS Global Insight, told the Associated Press.

The index has been edging higher since last October, coinciding with reports that show sales and home prices inching up too.

Source: “Index of US Homebuilder Confidence Improves; Builders Anticipate Sales Strengthening into '13,” Associated Press (Sept. 18, 2012)

Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 08:00 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Wednesday, January 11 2012

As home buyers continue to rank affordability high, more home styles are getting simpler and homes are becoming lower maintenance, according to the latest Home Design Trends Survey, conducted by the American Institute of Architects.

Simpler exterior details and the use of durable building products are growing in popularity, according to the third-quarter survey of architects, which mostly focused on community and neighborhood design.

“Consumers are favoring homes with low-maintenance exterior materials such as fiber-cement, stone, tile, and natural earth plasters,” according to the report. “This significantly outpaces any other home exterior feature in terms of its increase in popularity. Over the past year, there has been a dramatic decrease in the popularity of sustainable roofing materials, as well as in ‘cool’ roofs with high solar reflective characteristics. Tubular skylights have also decreased in popularity over the past year.”

Also, could large residential subdivisions start becoming a thing of the past? According to the survey of architects, there has been a shift away from large residential subdivisions toward smaller-scale infill development projects, which tend to focus more on affordability, access to public transportation, nearby commercial opportunities, and job centers. The survey also revealed increased interest among consumers for neighborhoods that can accommodate a growing number of multigenerational households and that encourage more interaction with the community.

Source: http://stagedsold.blogs.realtor.org/2012/01/03/trend-watch-home-design-gets-simpler/

Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 08:00 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Monday, June 06 2011

After the recent tornadoes in Joplin, Missouri, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and even here in the Tri-State storm resistant homes are getting a lot of attention. In fact, a construction company in Perry County says more and more people are asking about these strong homes.

It's the place you go to during severe weather. A place that should be your safest bet.

"Mother Nature does what Mother Nature wants to do, however, what we do with ICF is give our customers the best chance at survival," Josh Harris said.

Josh Harris builds energy efficient homes using Insulated Concrete Forms. His Perry County Company started building these homes five years ago. So far, they have built eight homes, a chapel, and several basements using ICF.

Inside the foam is a solid wall of concrete. A wall so strong, Harris says it can protect your family from flying debris during a tornado.

So far this year, there have been 1,403 tornado reports in the U.S., at least 15 of those were reported in the Tri-State.

"When you see all the storm devastation with these helicopter photos, you can see the foundations left. Our walls are the foundation," Harris said.

Josh Clark has lived in his tornado resistant home for two years.

"I wanted the family to not have to worry in the middle of the night, have to listen to the radio and get up and run to the basement. I feel very confident that we're safe in any room in the house," Josh Clark said.

He says he would encourage others to build one of these in a heart beat.

"Basically, when I hear there's a tornado coming, I call the neighbors up and invite them to come over and sit in the safe house because I don't have any problems, I don't feel, like I need to run to the basement, I just feel very safe and content," Clark said.

A shield from the danger outside, a home many say can save lives.

Harris says these houses cost about 5% more than a stick frame house, but they are so energy efficient, owners gain that money back because of lower energy bills.

Source: http://tristatehomepage.com/fulltext?nxd_id=276137

Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 08:00 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Friday, January 14 2011

Reporting from the 2011 International Builders Show, Erica Christoffer for HouseLogic

What do home buyers want today and in the future? The answer: smaller, more energy-efficient homes.

The average size of a new single-family home in 2010 was 2,377 sq. ft., down from 2,438 sq. ft. in 2009 and down from the peak of 2,520 sq. ft. in 2007 and 2008, according to U.S. Census Bureau data presented yesterday at the International Builders’ Show in Orlando by Rose Quint, assistant vice president of survey research for NAHB.

And the trend will only continue, Quint said, with the 2015 new home size currently projected at 2,150 sq. ft. with fewer bathrooms and smaller garages.

It’s hard to say whether home sizes will decline to 1970 levels of 1,500 square feet. But Quint says she believes smaller sizes are here to stay based on demographics. The U.S. population was 310 million as of April 2010. That’s expected to rise to 322 million in 2015 and up to 422 million by 2050. The population is also getting older and more diverse. In 2010, 25% were over the age of 55, which is expected to grow to 31% by 3050.

This rising segment of older home owners who won’t want to care for a huge space, Quint said, and then you have Generation Y buyers who are very energy conscious. “People are coming to realize, ‘Let’s buy what we need,’” said Quint.

The Census Bureau data matches NAHB’s findings that builders expect to build smaller homes with more green features in the next five years. Low-energy windows, water-efficient features, engineered-wood beams, joints, or trusses, and Energy-Star ratings for whole home are expected to be more prevalent.

Builders also expect an increase in living room size as well as more planning for universal design features with homes more easily adaptable for future improvements.

Jill Waage, executive editor with Better Homes and Gardens, also presented her magazine’s 2011 consumer preferences survey, which was taken the first week of December. According to Waage, the top three improvement priorities home owners want were a laundry room, additional storage, and a home office.

“The connection to outdoor living space is also really important,” Waage says.

Other trends included in the Better Homes and Gardens study: built-ins, media space for flat screen TVs and gaming systems, and areas wired for technology. Buyers also want combined kitchen, family room, and living room open space. Universal design features, she said, will be incorporated in much more subtle ways.



Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/news/articles/homes-are-getting-smaller-more-energy-efficient/#ixzz1B1aOTnWN
Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 09:41 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Monday, September 27 2010

Here are the products grabbing the attention of the home building and remodeling industries, according to Bill Millholland, executive vice president of sales and marketing at Case Design/Remodeling in Maryland, and Jamie Gibbs, a New York-based interior designer:

· Appliance Drawers. Small warning drawers, modest-sized dishwasher drawers for small loads, refrigerator drawers and microwave drawers.

· Counter-depth refrigerators. Some are only 24 inches deep.

· Motion-detecting faucets. Like you'd find in the restrooms of businesses.

· LED (light-emitting diode) lighting. These are used under cabinets and in ceiling fixtures as a longer-lasting, more efficient alternative to compact fluorescent lamps and incandescent bulbs.

· Electric heated floors. A nice touch in bathrooms,

· Showers with multiple heads and body sprays. Bathtubs are out.

Source: The Washington Post (09/25/2010)

http://www.realtor.org/RMODaily.nsf/pages/News2010092705?OpenDocument

Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 03:32 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
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The Trentini Team
F.C. Tucker EMGE REALTORS®
7820 Eagle Crest Bvd., Suite 200
Evansville, IN 47715
Office: (812) 479-0801
Cell: (812) 499-9234
Email: Rolando@RolandoTrentini.com


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