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Thursday, January 17 2013
The real estate climate forecast for the coming year is partly sunny -- and warming up! Yet, with no double-digit appreciation in sight, some who plan on selling a home inEvansville face the very practical question: is the winter of ’13 the right time to sell?
For those who stand to make a gain from selling, the decision boils down to convenience. Whether sale prices rise or fall, the cost of their next home will probably move in the same direction.
But what about those who suspect that the overhang from the financial crisis will probably result in some degree of net loss? How do they decide whether it makes more sense to sell and take the loss, or to rent -- and wait? Emotions aside, the financial impacts can be examined. If you are considering selling a home in the area and don’t stand to make a profit, asking yourself some questions can help reach a decision:
 
·          Can I afford to take a loss? If you might need cash from your current property to purchase another, waiting is likely to be the safest course.
 
·          If I have to take a loss, will there be a tax advantage to doing so in 2013? If you expect to sell a business or come into any other form of extra income during this tax year, check with your CPA to see if this year’s the right time.
 
 
·          If I choose to rent my home, am I prepared to be a landlord? Are you up-to-date on applicable federal and local fair housing ordinances and tenants’ rights issues? If not, it’s practical to factor in the cost of a property management agency (usually 7 – 15%)
 
·          Am I prepared to wait it out? If you decide to rent a local home and wait for the market to catch up to your profit goals, are you prepared to wait X years before selling? On-again off-again selling decisions can result in high tenant turnover -- which eats into your bottom line.
 
 
Selling a home vs. renting it out is a decision only you can make -- why starting with accurate information is so important. I will be happy to meet for a confidential consultation on the value of your local home in today’s market. It is a very good place to start.
Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 08:00 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Monday, August 08 2011

Homeowners are familiar with the tax deductions that are available to them but there are also potential deductions available for those who own rental properties. Realtor® Joe Cline of Austin, Texas lists seven possible deductions that rental property owners will want to be aware of:

Do you own any property that you rent out as investment? If yes, did you know that you can take advantage of tax deductions provided for owners of rental properties? That is right; aside from the income you earn by renting out and the possible profits from appreciation of your capital, owing a property can also reduce your income tax. In fact, rental real estate offers the most tax benefits compared to almost any other investment out there. Here are some of the possible tax deductions property rental owners can enjoy:

 

1. Tax deduction from interest
Rental property owners can take advantage of interest as their biggest tax deductible expense. If you are paying interest payments on a loan you obtained to buy the property, or if you pay interest on credit cards for services and goods incurred due to rental, you can declare these for tax deduction purposes.

 

2. Tax deduction due to property depreciation
Rental property owners may also recover the cost of their property by considering depreciation. Depreciation takes into account the deterioration and the wear and tear caused onto the property over time.

 

3. Deduction from repairs
Taxation regulations also allow deductions brought about by repair and improvement-related expenses, as long as these repairs are necessary and reasonable. The costs of improvement are fully deductible in the same taxation year as they were incurred. Fixing gutters, repainting, fixing leaks and floors, and replacement of broken windows – these are some examples of tax deductible repairs.

 

4. Deduction from insurance
You can also reduce your income tax by deducting the premiums you pay for insurance related to your rental transactions. This includes landlord liability insurance, fire or theft insurance for your rental property. If you hired employees, you may also deduct the amount you pay for their health or compensation insurance.

 

5. Deduction from professional and legal services
You can deduct all fees you pay for accountants, lawyers, real estate advisers, property management services, and other professional services you hire for your rental activity. These are considered part of your operating expenses.

 

6. Tax deduction from hiring employees and/or independent contractors
If you hire the services of other employees to perform something related to the rental, you can also deduct the wages you pay them as part of your business expense.

 

7. Deduction from travel expenses
If you spend on travel expenses because of your rental business, such as when collecting rent or inspecting your rental property for maintenance, you can deduct your fuel expenses, meals and other related expenditures. Even overnight travel may be deductible, as long as there are proper records to back up the claim.

 

As a rental property owner, there are tax deductions you can take advantage of to lower your yearly taxes. The abundance of these deductible expenses makes rental real estate one of the most attractive investments there is. Know which types you qualify for, and see how much potential savings you have been missing out on.



Read more: Seven Possible Tax Deductions For Property Rental Owners | REALTOR.com® Blogs
Posted by: Rolando Trentinni AT 08:00 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
Wednesday, May 26 2010

Renting out your house can be a smart financial move, as long as you calculate your costs carefully.

 

You have a single-family house you’d like to rent out. Perhaps you’re temporarily relocating for work, or maybe you inherited your childhood home from your parents, and you’re not quite ready to part with it yet.

 

Renting can be a profitable choice, but it requires an investment of time, money, and organization to make it work. Here’s how to determine whether renting out your house is worth the cost.

Calculate your monthly expenses

You want to charge at least enough to cover your monthly outlay. So the first step is to use our free downloadable worksheet to calculate your costs. Start with regular expenses like mortgage, maintenance, and homeowners association dues.

You may also need to upgrade your insurance coverage. Your agent can advise you about adding landlord insurance, a special type of policy that covers rental properties. As a rule, landlord insurance costs about 25% more than standard homeowners insurance.

If you’re renting the house furnished, make sure you’re covered for the personal possessions you leave behind. Jane Cline, the insurance commissioner of West Virginia, tells owners to prepare a detailed inventory of household items. If you’re renting the house unfurnished, figure in the costs of moving and storing your items.

Check out prospective tenants

As a practical matter, you’ll have to formally check out your prospective renters. MrLandlord.com, an information and service site for landlords, suggests a variety of background checks: credit reports, eviction reports, and criminal background reports. None of these is expensive, but you must get your prospects’ permission.

MrLandlord.com charges $8.95 for an eviction report. A combined credit and eviction report is $14.95. If you want to be especially careful, a countywide criminal report costs $29.95.

Account for maintenance and upgrades

Even with the most scrupulous checks, you can’t be completely sure renters will take good care of your home. Eva Rosenberg, an enrolled agent in Northridge, Calif., advises that if you’re not within easy driving distance of your rental property, you’ll need to arrange for someone else to keep an eye on the place, even if it’s just to make sure the lawn is mowed. If the tenants are neglecting upkeep, you’ll want to know about it sooner rather than later, since it could be a warning sign of trouble down the line.

Of course, even if the renters are conscientious, problems can crop up: boilers will fail; roofs may leak; washing machine hoses can burst. If household systems or appliances need repair or replacement, you’re better off spending the money up front, before the fix becomes an expensive emergency.

You may also want to invest in some of the “extras” that Sue Peters, a broker in Wellfleet, Mass., recommends adding to attract a tenant willing to pay a higher fee. She suggests spending money on air conditioning, expanded-channel cable TV, and a Wi-Fi network.

Don’t want the headaches? Hire a property manager

You can save yourself a lot of time and effort if you engage a management company to oversee the property and take care of the details. Some firms charge a percentage of the rental fee, others a flat monthly fee, based on the extent of services. Joe Aimone of GoRenter in Phoenix, Ariz., says his firm offers a variety of services, starting at as little as $50 a month, including general maintenance, rent collection, and—if necessary—eviction.

A management company can help you figure out how much to charge, find and vet tenants, and prepare a lease. It will also pay the real estate taxes on your behalf and present you with an annual 1099 form. Many management companies maintain 24-hour emergency lines and a roster of approved service people, so they can take care of plumbing or electrical problems and bill you later. A property manager will also see that driveways and sidewalks are shoveled, so you don’t find yourself with an unpleasant claim against your liability insurance.

Expect to pay a management company 8% to 10% of the annual gross rent, on average, with a $50 to $85 monthly minimum.

Keep scrupulous records

Whether or not you use a management company, you’ll have to keep extensive business records. DeDe Jones, CFP, CPA, in Lakewood, Colo., advises owners to save receipts for any expenses and to file them carefully.

The IRS treats maintenance expenditures, like a new hot-water heater, differently from capital improvements, such as a new deck or patio, so you’ll want to consult a tax professional. Meanwhile, keep the two types of receipts separate to make tax prep easier. You’ll have to file Schedule E on Form 1040, which can also serve as a template for the kinds of records you’ll need.

Finally, because of the complex tax and liability issues involved, many financial experts suggest forming a corporation when you become a landlord. An attorney can advise you about whether incorporating makes sense in your situation.

Richard J. Koreto has been editor of several professional financial magazines and is the author of “Run It Like a Business,” a practice management book for financial planners. He and his wife own a pre-Civil War house in Rockland County, New York.

Source: http://www.houselogic.com/articles/costs-renting-out-your-house/

Posted by: Rolando Trentini AT 08:00 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
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The Trentini Team
F.C. Tucker EMGE REALTORS®
7820 Eagle Crest Bvd., Suite 200
Evansville, IN 47715
Office: (812) 479-0801
Cell: (812) 499-9234
Email: Rolando@RolandoTrentini.com


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